Victoria

I attended Victoria Secondary Modern Boys School from 1957 – 1961, although in this period of my life I was known as David Jones, I didn’t know that actually my name was David Taylor-Jones, my mother having changed my name by deedpole for her special reasons without me knowing it!
So if any of my old class mates read this I hope this is helpful. I now live in France, near Nice and get home occasionally to visit the town in which I grew up. This story is from a collection that I have made about my early life called “Life in the Suburbs”.

Victoria Secondary Modern Prize Giving Ceremony 1962 (5 Upper GCE Class of 1961) Back row, from left to right: J. McLean, D. Broom, P. Hancock, P. Kingsley, D. Taylor-Jones, C. Heathcote, R. Knight Front row, from left to right: R. Gilmour, N. Timms, D. Batchelor, J. Cockram J.P. (Guest Speaker), F. Amor.

Victoria Secondary Modern Prize Giving Ceremony 1962 (5 Upper GCE Class of 1961)
Back row, from left to right: J. McLean, D. Broom, P. Hancock, P. Kingsley, D. Taylor-Jones, C. Heathcote, R. Knight
Front row, from left to right: R. Gilmour, N. Timms, D. Batchelor, J. Cockram J.P. (Guest Speaker), F. Amor.

 

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This page was added on 20/06/2015.

Comments about this page

  • You all make me feel so old !!1
    I was at Victoria School from Sep 1937 to December 1939 when I was taken out to Australia!1
    First year= Mr Hard and the second we had Mr Lanham!
    I attended quite a few schools out there during the next 18 months — But none equalled the Watford School !
    I couldn’t wait to leave at 14 ???

    Eddie Aldridge

    By edwin aldridge (07/09/2018)
  • You all make me feel so old !!1
    I was at Victoria School from Sep 1937 to December 1939 when I was taken out to Australia!1
    First year= Mr Hard and the second we had Mr Lanham!
    I attended quite a few schools out there during the next 18 months — But none equalled the Watford School !
    I couldn’t wait to leave at 14 ???

    Eddie Aldridge

    By edwin aldridge (07/09/2018)
  • Since this story’s publication I have been contacted by old class mates who had read my Victoria memories, and two imortant things have happened.
    First, Peter Lombardi contacted me and together we have put together a Reunion of some of our class mates. We meet every year for a night out and to remember the time we spent growing up together in Watford. Presently we are Dave Taylor-Jones, Peter Lombardi, Dave Elson, Peter Hancock, Colin Heathcote, Martin Malvisi and David Pomfret.
    And secondly, in this story of Victoria I made the mistake of thinking that none of our teachers would still be alive. But we have been put in contact, by the Watford Museum, with Mr. Michael Crump, who was a young teacher when he joined Victoria in 1957. It was his first teaching post. He was often responsible for organising our sports afternoons. One time, he discovered that someone was stealing personal possessions from the changing-rooms in Cassiobury Park, while we were absent on the pitches. Crump decided to catch the thief and hid himself in the changing rooms after we had left to play football. He caught the thief red-handed and gave chase when he fled. The man didn’t realise that Michael Crump was very fit, a fast sprinter and only twenty-two years old. He was quickly overtaken and apprehended. There were no more thefts after that. In 2017, I had the pleasure of traveling with Peter Lombardi to meet him in Edindburgh. We took him out to dinner and he told us some wonderful tales of Victoria, this time from a teacher’s perspective. He was responsible for much of the Drama presentations at the school and also organised and led many trips to France and Spain.

    And all of this because the Watford Musem was kind enough to put my story on its website. So thank you very much, Watford Museum.

    Dave Taylor-Jones

    By Dave Taylor-Jones (11/08/2018)
  • Your account of life at Victoria school was so accurate. I attended Victoria from 1954 – 1958. You brought back lots of memories including the trip to France with Church and Spouge. You refer to Tombo he was a real mummies boy, he was still living with his mother when teaching at Victoria. One day I bumbed into him on the way to Watford Hospital where I was receiving physio because I had been stabbed at school which cut tendons, nerves and arteries. His comment was quit shirking and get to school. As you say it was a tough school but I did ok. I’ve lived in Canada since 1963 before retiring I owned my own company life has been good to me. Thanks for the memories.
    Robert Reece

    By Robert Reece (04/06/2018)
  • As an ex Caledonian lad I would correct you on the paragraph about us. We were not all orphans or even poor. The majority had parents, usually a single mother or father. Obviously there was a scottish connection through the forces or a relative in the forces. Our kilts were only worn at ‘home’ so to speak and we only got into fights when picked on. Which was often. A lot of our education was only in between school times as we didn’t get involved in outside activities. I went there from 58-62.
    All the rest of your recollections ring so true, Cassiobury cross country runs, hell in the snow.
    Thanks for the memories.

    By E Church (02/03/2018)
  • Does anyone remember a pupil known as Sharkie? He was friends with my Dad in the mid 1950s at Victoria Boys’.

    I’ve always wondered what happened to him, as they used to tease the local bullies by climbing a massive wall and taunting them from the top!

    Leave a comment or contact the site administrator if you want to be in touch directly with me.

    Jessica

    By Jessica Leschnikoff (11/01/2018)
  • David Taylor – Jones

    Well done – you bring back great memories .

    Mr Pereira – the poker – ha ha – he and Jack taught me well – am Chairman and Co Owner of 3 large Engineering Companies

    Well done Dave

    By PETER ( BOMBER ) LOMBARDI (05/05/2016)
  • I really enjoy reading Dave’s stories as they are very precise and make you feel as if you are back again in our youth.
    Dave is my brother-in-law, married to my sister Bonny.
    My younger brother Pete went to the same school as myself but on the other side of the tracks to where Dave lived and grew up. He was at Victoria and my brother and I were at Hampden on Little Oxhey Lane. Much could be written in an identical mode as to Dave’s adventures including the dread of starting at Hampden at the age of eleven years old. Except for the different names of the teachers and the names of close friends his whole story line mimics my own recollections.
    I am so glad he took the time to write his stories of growing up and for the Watford Museum to appreciate the time and effort he has spent recounting times spent in Watford back in the fifties and sixties.
    Well done Dave
    Regards,
    Paul Kelly now living in St. John’s, Newfoundland

    By Paul Kelly (12/07/2015)

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